Voters could send message

October 13, 2010 They’ve done it again.Tuesday night, the residents of Batesville got a slap in the face when the eight aldermen voted to increase property millages at the city council meeting without any explanation as to why. It reeked of Big Brother saying, “We know what’s best for you.”This is the same city council that can drag decisions out for months unless it’s self-serving.Let’s keep in mind, these are the same eight people who want to give themselves four-year terms instead of two.

Finding common ground

October 12, 2010 A reader and email friend in Heber Springs wrote, “In conclusion it’s a no brainier identifying problems. It’s the resolution that counts and I think of all the mistakes we as a nation have made in the past and will continue to make in the present and future. When the two parties are united for the common good there is nothing that we cannot do. Amen and amen. HY”

Beltway lessons

October 12, 2010 The evidence is right under their noses, yet they ignore it.I am living in the Washington, D.C., area for a spell. I moved here temporarily from Pittsburgh — flyover country — which is the land of friendly, considerate people.People are not so considerate in D.C. — particularly on the roadways.Drivers here come from every part of the globe and drive every kind of vehicle. Yet most have one thing in common.You better get out of their way.

Weird about money

October 12, 2010 We’re weird about money.  We want it.  But nobody wants to talk about it.Sometimes — like on a date or at a class reunion — we pretend like we have it, when we don’t.Other times —like when we see a homeless person or our kids whine for designer jeans — we pretend we don’t have any, when in fact we do.I come from a long line of money weirdness. My parents fought about money.  But they told us that it was rude to talk about money.

Why religious literacy matters

October 11, 2010  Twenty-first century America is the most religiously diverse society on Earth and — among developed countries — one of the most religious.But how much do inhabitants of our faith-saturated land actually know about religion? Not very much, according to a new survey released by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life on Sept. 28.Fewer than half of Americans know that Martin Luther inspired the Reformation, the Dalai Lama is Buddhist, the Jewish Sabbath begins on Friday and other basic facts about the world’s major faiths.

Hats off to teachers

October 11, 2010 When your nephew tells you how much he likes his teachers at school and wonders if there might be a chance that you, his aunt the reporter, could write a little something about them, it’s hard to say no. Even after Hagen told me that he knows there’s things more important that need to be put in the newspaper, I knew I had to do something and decided to make it this week’s column. Hagen is a fifth-grader at Hillcrest Elementary in Lynn, but I couldn’t believe it when he told me he has four teachers.

It takes more than speechifying

October 11, 2010 Nobody questions Barack Obama’s talent as an effective orator — it’s more a question of what he says than how he says it.With or without those omnipresent teleprompters, the president is failing to connect to the majority of his fellow Americans, mainly because they emphatically disagree with most of the snake-oil policies he’s trying to sell them.

Speaker support

October 8, 2010 Dear Editor:I understand that the candidates from the first Congressional district race will participate in a debate at the University of Central Arkansas next week. Unquestionably there are many topics to be discussed in this first post-primary debate, one of which should be about the future Speaker of the House.

Budget woes

October 8, 2010 Dear editor:As if six-figure salaries for lottery executives weren’t enough, the Arkansas Lottery Commission has been allowing top executives paid time off, some as much as 500 hours, according to an article on ArkansasBusiness.com. Thankfully, that policy was recently reversed.But, how ill-fitting it is that our state’s spending habits mirror those of Washington, where it’s deemed acceptable to spend advertising dollars to promote an $862 billion stimulus bill.