Sports Briefs

Pro baseball

Pittsburgh center fielder and San Diego third baseman Chase Headley were among nine players who won Gold Gloves for the first time.

Baltimore shortstop J.J. Hardy also was in the first-time group. The Orioles were the only team with three winners, with center fielder Adam Jones and catcher Matt Wieters also being picked by major league managers and coaches.

St. Louis catcher Yadier Molina and Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira each won for the fifth time.

Angels center fielder Mike Trout didn’t get chosen despite a season full of sensational catches. The San Francisco Giants were shut out after playing great defense to win the World Series.

Pitcher Jake Peavy and the Chicago White Sox agreed to a $29 million, two-year contract.

The right-hander will receive $14.5 million in each of the next two seasons. Peavy could receive a $15 million option for 2015 if he has 400 innings in the next two years, including a minimum of 190 in 2014, and he doesn’t finished 2014 on the disabled list.

Chicago also exercised a $9.5 million option on right-hander Gavin Floyd, declined a $10 million option on right-hander Brett Myers and turned down a $13 million option on third baseman Kevin Youkilis, acquired from Boston in June.

The Los Angeles Dodgers brought back Brandon League, agreeing to a $22.5-million, three-year deal.

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DETROIT — Jim Leyland is returning next year as manager of the Detroit Tigers.

The team and its manager quickly ended any remaining speculation about his status by announcing that Leyland’s contract was extended through 2013. He managed on a one-year deal this year and led the Tigers to the World Series, where they were swept by the San Francisco Giants.

 

The NCAA

INDIANAPOLIS — The NCAA passed a proposal that will impose tougher sanctions on programs and hold coaches more accountable for rule-breaking.

The board’s decision concludes an effort that began in August 2011 when university leaders met with NCAA President Mark Emmert at a retreat in Indianapolis in the midst of one of the most scandalous years in college sports history.

Under the new legislation, programs that commit the most egregious violations could face postseason bans of two to four years and fines totaling millions. Head coaches also could be suspended for up to one full season for violations committed by their assistants if they cannot prove they were unaware of the infractions.

 

Pro basketball

GREENBURGH, N.Y. — Amare Stoudemire could be sidelined for two months, the second straight season the New York Knicks forward will miss significant time because of injury.

The Knicks said that Stoudemire would have left knee surgery and could be out six to eight weeks, more than twice as long as originally estimated when he was hurt during the preseason.

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DENVER — Ty Lawson signed a four-year, $48 million extension with the Denver Nuggets, eliminating a distraction that’s been hanging over the team and its star point guard for weeks.

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CLEVELAND — Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert wishes he wouldn’t have guaranteed his team would win an NBA title before LeBron James.

When James left Cleveland for Miami as a free agent in July 2010, Gilbert famously promised in a letter to disappointed Cleveland fans that his Cavs would win a championship before James got one with the Heat.

Well, that ended in June when James, capping his third MVP season, led Miami to a finals win over Oklahoma City.

“Looking back now, that probably was not the most brilliant thing I’ve ever done in my life,” Gilbert said.

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INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana Pacers forward Danny Granger is out indefinitely because of a sore left knee.

Team officials said that Granger will get a second opinion on the injury and an update will be provided following that visit.

 

Youth football

DEERFIELD BEACH, Fla. — Authorities said they uncovered a massive gambling operation targeting youth football games in South Florida, leading them to arrest nine men, including several coaches with extensive criminal backgrounds who they say exploited kids to turn a profit.

The 18-month long investigation started when ESPN journalists brought Broward County Sheriff’s officials surveillance video showing parents openly exchanging money in the stands while watching their kids’ tackle football games. Authorities later uncovered the stakes on pee wee games were high, with more than $100,000 wagered on the youth football championship.