• Kids seeking asylum, find antipathy

    I might be the only syndicated columnist in the country who was raised by the state. So when lawmakers and public pontificators discuss the welfare of unaccompanied minors who’ve been dropped on our proverbial doorstep, I should probably speak up. I was a ward of …

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  • Teenagers not working doesn’t work for America

    Here’s a trend that may not bode well for the future of our country: According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 40 percent of 16- to 19-year-olds have summer jobs — down from 75 percent of teens a generation ago. As it …

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  • July’s done; what will August hold in store?

    When this year rolled around I started with a real effort on projecting a positive attitude, which worked until the winter blahs came along and I moved into my ho-humbug mindset. But as winter turned to spring, then summer and with all the beautiful days …

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  • Domestic violence and equality for the sexes

    As usual, all I have to do in order to come up with something to write about in an opinion column is to read a few of the news stories floating around out there. This week? It’s lawsuits, the NFL, and idiots on television (not …

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  • The interesting career of Judge Edward Cross

    A man of insight, drive and integrity, Edward Cross looked to serve and build the young state of Arkansas, as a lawyer, judge and businessman. Cross became one of the most respected minds that Arkansas leaders looked to in its early, chaotic years. Edward Cross …

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  • From Ireland to Izard County: John Maloy and early Sylamore

    Can you imagine being a young boy in Ireland in the early 1800s? Surviving the potato famine and with little hope of the future, John Maloy, born in Tyrone, Ireland, in 1805, boarded a merchant ship in 1832 leaving behind family and friends, the life …

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  • Grandma and the Great Flood of ’37

    We’ve had more rain this year than I can ever remember, and probably others can remember, too. Our little country lane has been flooded in spots I’ve never seen water cross the road before in my 40 years.  But we’ve had it pretty good. When …

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  • T-minus 28 months and counting

    Bust out the gin and tonics because this is shaping up to be one heck of a long hot summer, both weather-wise and politics-wise. All over the world, hostilities are flaring like out of control wildfires. While here at home, it’s the words that have …

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  • Reading Rainbow soaring free

    The extraordinary success of Reading Rainbow’s Kickstarter campaign — with a record-breaking hundred thousand donors chipping in over $5 million for distributing Reading Rainbow‘s literacy material as widely as possible to children, particularly those in greatest financial need — demonstrates how crowdfunding may shape up …

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  • Learning also means letting go

    Common Core state standards are meant to outline what students are expected to know upon high school graduation to ensure they are “career- and college-ready,” but how “life-ready” will they be? I recently read a column in the Los Angeles Times titled “What today’s kids …

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  • We can’t leave these men behind

    The situation on Texas’ southern border is not the only refugee crisis facing the United States. Thousands of Afghan interpreters who need to get out before the Taliban kills them for collaborating with U.S. troops are stuck over there because the State Department has run …

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  • Fox, cat, coon — or chupacabra? Mystery animal carcass found under writer’s house

    Anytime someone buys a house, it always comes with some surprises but last Sunday we got the shock of our lives when my husband found a dead animal hanging upside down under the house. Finding a dead animal under one’s house isn’t that unusual but …

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