• Shirley Temple’s America

    Shirley Temple, the iconic child actress, died earlier this week at age 85. Reports on her death were easy to miss. I was dismayed by the sparse reaction to the loss of this woman who lived a great American life. Had Shirley Temple died 50 …

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  • When the wagon was new, and the crow could talk

    My recent column about my great-grandmother Mary Russ Martin and her daughter, my grandmother-to-be Myrtle Martin Farrier, who lived along Poke Bayou 10 miles west of Cave City drew several comments from readers. The column was about conditions, and the family’s coping with conditions, during …

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  • Wondering if animal rights activists use shampoo, medicine

    Recently my eighth-grader had a school project in which she had to pick a speech that someone else had given, read it to her class and then discuss it. I was thinking of all kinds of famous speeches by individuals such as Martin Luther King …

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  • Voice for civil rights in Arkansas

    John Gray Lucas was born in the chaos of the Civil War and became a voice for civil rights in Arkansas. He was born in East Texas in 1864. His mother had been a slave who became a refugee as she sought to escape the …

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  • Trying to get the hang of positive thinking

    Dear February: I am still trying to get the hang of this New Year’s resolution business. After years of failing I’ve learned to shy away from the notion that I will be umpteen sizes smaller or that my bank account will expand overnight (it’s usually …

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  • Stress, thy name is Valentine’s Day

    At the risk of being branded a Valentine Grinch, I must take issue with opinions expressed recently in the Winnipeg Sun. Writer Shelley Cook tried to contrast Valentine’s Day as experienced by adults and by children. She saw the holiday as complicated and anxiety-producing for …

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  • Frontier line: Defining the ‘West’

    The Census Bureau definition of the “frontier line” was a settlement density of two people per square mile. The “West” was the recently settled area near that boundary. The frontier line, moved steadily westward from the 1630s to the 1880s. In the 21st century, however, …

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  • Justifying what we put in daughter’s sippy cup

    Got Coke? Sure, we have it in our house — and lots of it, usually. I may as well admit it: Gary and I are as addicted to sodas as Charlie Sheen is to … well, you know. Overall in my life, I have probably …

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  • Letters to the Editor

    Exaggerations Dear Editor: In reference to Tina Dupuy’s op-ed piece that appeared in the Jan. 29 edition of the Batesville Guard, let me make some corrections to her gross exaggerations. First, let me correct her on the exaggeration that “anti-abortion activists are not for programs …

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  • State Capitol Week in Review

    As we enter the state’s third Fiscal Session, we are reminded of the power the voters have to amend our laws. After all, Fiscal Sessions began when back in 2008, 69 percent of voters said we should meet every year. Our state constitution was written …

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  • Horror stories in Sochi

    We thought the big controversies in the Sochi Winter Olympics would be toothpaste terrorism or government-sanctioned homophobia. Then the press tried to check into their hotels and discovered a comical array of foibles that will do nothing to boost the Russian tourism industry. But what …

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  • Old Man Winter making an old woman outta me

    Old Man Winter is making an old woman out of me. If messing up schedules, making it so it’s best just to stay home (unless you have to work) and causing trouble for emergency personnel weren’t reason enough, it’s also aging me more quickly than …

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