• From Ireland to Izard County: John Maloy and early Sylamore

    Can you imagine being a young boy in Ireland in the early 1800s? Surviving the potato famine and with little hope of the future, John Maloy, born in Tyrone, Ireland, in 1805, boarded a merchant ship in 1832 leaving behind family and friends, the life …

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  • Grandma and the Great Flood of ’37

    We’ve had more rain this year than I can ever remember, and probably others can remember, too. Our little country lane has been flooded in spots I’ve never seen water cross the road before in my 40 years.  But we’ve had it pretty good. When …

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  • T-minus 28 months and counting

    Bust out the gin and tonics because this is shaping up to be one heck of a long hot summer, both weather-wise and politics-wise. All over the world, hostilities are flaring like out of control wildfires. While here at home, it’s the words that have …

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  • Reading Rainbow soaring free

    The extraordinary success of Reading Rainbow’s Kickstarter campaign — with a record-breaking hundred thousand donors chipping in over $5 million for distributing Reading Rainbow‘s literacy material as widely as possible to children, particularly those in greatest financial need — demonstrates how crowdfunding may shape up …

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  • Learning also means letting go

    Common Core state standards are meant to outline what students are expected to know upon high school graduation to ensure they are “career- and college-ready,” but how “life-ready” will they be? I recently read a column in the Los Angeles Times titled “What today’s kids …

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  • We can’t leave these men behind

    The situation on Texas’ southern border is not the only refugee crisis facing the United States. Thousands of Afghan interpreters who need to get out before the Taliban kills them for collaborating with U.S. troops are stuck over there because the State Department has run …

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  • Fox, cat, coon — or chupacabra? Mystery animal carcass found under writer’s house

    Anytime someone buys a house, it always comes with some surprises but last Sunday we got the shock of our lives when my husband found a dead animal hanging upside down under the house. Finding a dead animal under one’s house isn’t that unusual but …

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  • About Town

    If I mention the county fair, what’s the first thing you think of? Is it the lights of the midway on a hot summer night? Maybe it’s the smell of the animals in the barn getting ready for their yearly show. Perhaps it’s the vendors …

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  • Letter to the Editor

    Dear Editor, I am sick and tired of the constant phone calls! I called the 800 number to join the “Do Not Call List” and I am still bombarded by phone calls. One day alone I received 11 calls on my home phone and another …

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  • Wolf House at Norfork deserves study

    The Wolf House at Norfork, said to be the oldest governmental building west of the Mississippi that was not built by a foreign power, is impressive. To the eye, the two-story log building is most impressive when viewed from near the White River, just like …

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  • Debtors’ prisons: Not a thing of the past

    In this recession era of shrinking budgets and more than 100 years after the U.S. Supreme Court abolished debtors’ prisons, you might be surprised to learn that several states are still carrying on the practice of throwing people in prison who are too poor to …

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  • Catholic charities taking money from Obama to help illegal aliens

    During the 2012 presidential election, Republicans thought they found a sure path to victory. While it was obvious that long-coveted Hispanics weren’t going to budge, a different group (which an overwhelming majority of Hispanics belong) showed promise. Gallup found that America’s Roman Catholic vote has …

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