• Randolph Co. preserves rich history

    Randolph County is a treasure chest of early Arkansas history. Within 20 miles of Pocahontas, the county seat, visitors will find 13 historical sites ranging from the early territorial years through the introduction of statehood and into the Civil War era. Pocahontas, settled in 1807, …

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  • Musings on May Day

    Labor Day, celebrated each year on the first Monday of September, is widely known and celebrated as a holiday for American workers; perhaps less well known as a day for the labor movement is May Day, observed around the world on the first of the …

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  • State Capitol Week in Review

    The number of state prison inmates who are released on parole is steadily going up while the number who are discharged after serving out their entire sentence is going down, according to a report compiled by prison officials for the state Board of Correction. In …

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  • This is Arkansas – Spring Mill

    When built in 1867, Spring Mill was a “state-of-the-art” facility, complete with imported millstones and a Leffel 40-horsepower vertical water turbine shipped from Ohio. John A. Schnable (also spelled Schnabel, a Confederate veteran, built the stone dam and works for the original owner, A.N. Simmons. …

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  • Funny money

    For most Americans, a penny at the gas pump has vivid significance but billions of dollars create a meaningless blur. Increasingly, we are unable to fathom the really big numbers in our modern world, a condition known as innumeracy. In a recent 24-hour period, Facebook …

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  • War brings sick, wounded to Arkansas

    One hundred fifty years ago the stark realization of war has hitting home in Arkansas. The past several columns have identified a grave problem of an overwhelmed medical infrastructure in the state in 1862 as thousands of sick and wounded soldiers lie convalescing in the …

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  • There’s gold in them thar asteroids!

    Back when I was a tyke, the “Dick Tracy” comic strip ran an ongoing storyline about mining for gold on the moon. I loved it, but this was the sort of wild science fiction that turned off many of the venerable strip’s older readers. Fast …

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  • Up in smoke

    Towards the beginning of the cult classic “Dazed & Confused,” a high school senior named Slater, inquires of baby-faced freshman Mitch, “Are you cool?” What Slater is really asking — in this ode to 1970s youth and the counterculture — is “Do you smoke pot?” …

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  • Dumbing down the American dream

    Young Americans received unwelcome news this week when an April 23 AP report found 53.6 percent of college graduates under the age of 25 are jobless or underemployed, and there is little hope for improvement in the near future. This news is grim for young …

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  • The ‘crucial’ Hispanic vote, debunked

    After reading dozens of mainstream media newspaper and national magazine stories about the so-called “crucial” Latino November vote, I have sadly concluded that my journalism colleagues either can’t do simple math or have decided to forego fundamental research. The stories are the same. If presumptive …

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  • Union troops commandeer supplies

    On the outskirts of Batesville, Union troops were collecting supplies for their planned “Invasion of Batesville” May 12 and 13. The Union forces have a policy of trying to maintain good relations with the local citizens and businesses. It was reported that the Union troops …

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  • Walnut Ridge and the Beatles

    Walnut Ridge, the largest city in Lawrence County, is on the road to becoming a major tourist destination thanks to the Beatles. The Fab Four landed at the Walnut Ridge Airport in September 1964, en route to a well-deserved break from their first U.S. Tour. …

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