• This is what intolerance smells like

    President Obama’s new “religious tolerance” consultant to the Pentagon, Mikey Weinstein, wants Christian military service members who openly talk about their faith in uniform to be charged with treason, which is a crime punishable by death according to military law. By employing his consulting services, …

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  • Adventures in journalism

    Last week I got a phone call from one of the editors I work with. He wanted to “warn” me that a letter to the editor was being published in the paper about one of my columns and the person was NOT too happy with …

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  • A little girl who needed an angel

    When I lived in New York, my main mode of transportation was a bike. I worked six days each week, and my bicycle thought that the one day I had free should be spent fixing it. That was what I was doing the day Emily …

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  • Boston bombers and the theory of relative laziness

    My working theory — you could call it a philosophy, or a freestanding reason of how the world works — is what I call the Theory of Relative Laziness. It goes like this: Never attribute anything to conspiracy, coordination or planning when laziness could explain …

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  • Beware the American prom

    Editor Note: This is an excerpt from Tom Purcell’s new book, “Comical Sense: A Lone Humorist Takes on a World Gone Nutty!” available at amazon.com.   Proms sure have gotten expensive these days. According to the San Jose Mercury News, high school kids spend nearly …

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  • Paper hard to come by in war

    When the Civil War began, President Lincoln and his General-in-Chief Winfield Scott implemented a strategy in blockading the Southern ports. The plan also called for a Federal advance down the Mississippi River in the hopes of cutting the South in two.  The purpose of this …

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  • Dinner at the White House

    Each year, journalists, politicians and celebrities gather with the president for a few hours of fun at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner in Washington. At this year’s event, held April 27, Conan O’Brien was the guest speaker. Conan was quick to offer praise for the …

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  • Ogilvie: 50 years of cartoons!

    I became intrigued by art in 1954, while in the fourth grade at Sidney (Sharp County) Public School.  A talented high school boy came to our classroom and, using colored chalk, drew a Christmas scene on the blackboard. I seldom took my eyes off the …

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  • The Strawberries of Wrath

    The haciendas of Spanish America were based on enormous land grants from the Spanish crown and became the sites of large plantation farms worked on a neo-feudal basis by servile or near-servile labor. Such farms, typically, were situated near large concentrations of native labor, and …

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  • Boston Marathon bombing tweets

    When James French became the last person to be executed in 1966 under Oklahoma’s death penalty law, he uttered these famous last words (no joke) that quickly belong to the ages: “Hey fellas,” he shouted to reporters there to witness his electrocution. “How about this …

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  • Still hollering for gladiators

    Even before a drop of blood was spilt you could hear the sounds of the crowd growing with anticipation. Shouts, laughter, shrieks and howls could be heard from all corners of the great colosseum. The air was tangible, heavy with expectation and the smell of …

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  • Boots in Boston

    Riveted to our screens, we learned last week of the enormous value of social media and surveillance video when tragedy strikes. But — and this second point is as significant as the first — we were also reminded of the importance of established, well-funded, conventional …

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