• Will America regret Snowden’s intelligence leaks?

    A popular graphic making the rounds on the Internet shows Boston Marathon bombing terrorist brothers Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev with the caption: “Apparently Not Verizon Customers.” It refers to news reports that under a secret court order in April, the National Security Agency was collecting …

    Read More

  • Mister, Mister

    Here’s a little game I invented the other day after phoning the water company to complain about my bill and hearing an overly-chipper woman say, “Hi, Peter. How may I help you?” Increasingly I find that strangers who address me by my first name are …

    Read More

  • Intelligence omissions

    One hundred fifty years ago, following excursions and raids into Missouri, the Confederate forces in Jacksonport reported in good condition and ready for another confrontation with the enemy of blue coats, now settled in eastern Arkansas. On June 9, 1863, Gen. Sterling Price sent Gen. …

    Read More

  • 19th century laissez-faire: Who benefits today?

    Last week Michael Lind asked a silly question: If libertarianism is so great, why hasn’t any country tried it? The question is silly because the libertarian answer is obvious: Libertarianism is great for ordinary people, but not for the power elites that control countries and …

    Read More

  • Mexico can benefit by tapping into shale formations

    Mexico has a tremendous opportunity available to grow the average income, create hundreds of thousands of new jobs and accelerate the building of a middle class — and all that is required is removing the current barrier to capital investment. Let us explain. The Eagle …

    Read More

  • Institutional ‘solutions’ to school violence are beaucratic failures

    Liberals believe in creating institutions to solve problems. Conservatives believe the individual is better at solving problems. A 3-year-old deaf boy in Lincoln, Neb., is being bullied by public school officials to change his name because the hand sign for Hunter Spanjer looks like a …

    Read More

  • The power of Superman

    It is no accident that “Man of Steel,” the latest Superman movie, is opening on Father’s Day weekend. TV shows and movies based on Superman have always reflected America’s zeitgeist, but “Man of Steel” goes deeper into questioning America’s identify by examining the values that …

    Read More

  • 47th canoe race scheduled

    When explorer Henry Rowe Schoolcraft paddled down the river to Batesville in 1819, he unknowingly set the course for the National Explorer White River Canoe Race. The 47th annual contest will be held July 24-27 this year. Long touted as the “foremost water sports event …

    Read More

  • Through a (Google) Glass, darkly?

    Let me throw out two predictions so obvious that I shouldn’t even have to commit them to print: 1) Within days, if not hours, of  Google Glass’ release to the general public, hackers will “jailbreak” the hardware, allowing it to run any “Glassware” users desire …

    Read More

  • How long can Father’s Day survive?

    My son Gideon (age 9) assures me that he will be a good father someday, but will that be an empty accomplishment? In another 20 years or so will there even be a Father’s Day? At best, there will be a shortage of old-school, jack-of-all-trades …

    Read More

  • A hoy of sailors and other fun collective nouns

    Naming collective nouns is a time-honored alliteration of bards dating back to medieval days. Their linguistic talents have bequeathed to the English language some intriguing terms, especially for groups of animals. While many are well-known and rather bland (pack of dogs, herd of elephants, swarm …

    Read More

  • Denmark can keep its philosophy

    Recently I read an article by Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in which he praised the social and economic system in Denmark and talked about how the United States could learn a huge lesson from them. You’re all familiar with Denmark, right? That little country southwest …

    Read More