• First woman elected U.S. Senator

    Hattie Wyatt Caraway will go down in American history as the first woman elected to the U.S. Senate. And, it was Arkansas voters who made it happen back in 1932. In November 1931, Caraway was appointed by Arkansas Gov. Harvey Parnell to fill the vacancy …

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  • 2013 State of the City address

    Tonight I come before you to deliver my State of the City address. 2012 saw its share of challenges for our city but the successes continued moving our community forward. First and foremost, your city operated within its budget constraints and its financial condition is …

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  • Are things piling up?

    Have you ever realized how things seem to simply pile up? I have just endured about 4 1/2 weeks of reducing these piles, sheet by sheet, stack by stack, and at times it felt like word by word — junk mail, business letters, tax paperwork, …

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  • Competing with confidence

    Our high school wrestling team was gathering to board the bus when Coach came out of his office. He walked over to me. “Howard, Hardy has the flu. You’re replacing him on varsity tonight.” I felt a rush of adrenaline. I was a freshman, and …

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  • Facebook fatigue

    Editor note: This is an excerpt from Tom Purcell’s new book, “Comical Sense: A Lone Humorist Takes on a World Gone Nutty!” available at amazon.com.   I’m turning into my father. My father was born in 1933. He was a paperboy in the days when …

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  • Why you shouldn’t tell your boss everything

    A family friend who worked at the White House said that one of the biggest challenges is deciding what to tell and what not to tell the President. There aren’t enough hours in the day to brief the boss on everything. You have to figure …

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  • Publisher owned first ‘pay’ library

    William E. Woodruff (1795-1885) is best known as the founder of Arkansas’ first newspaper, the Arkansas Gazette, in 1821. However, he is also credited with opening the first “lease/purchase” library in Little Rock in 1826. His first attempt to “rent” books apparently failed. Woodruff sold …

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  • Does First Amendment allow student prayers?

    Students are free to pray in public schools — except when they aren’t. If this sounds confusing, pity school administrators charged with figuring out if and when to draw the line on student prayers. Current controversies illustrate how complicated this line-drawing has become: School officials …

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  • The cut is in the mail

    It’s Nixon’s fault. I speak of the financial woes of the U.S. Postal Service, and the recent news that cutting Saturday mail delivery may save a few billion dollars a year. As it goes, President Nixon, tired of strikes by then-government postal workers, signed the …

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  • The Red Rebs

    Relax. It’s not necessarily the flu making you confused and feverish. Could be spatter from that big, thick, juicy, new, improved Civil War infecting the Republican Party. Yes, again. The Rebs inside the Reds are rebooting themselves for the umpteenth time over the past few …

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  • Et tu, Iceland?

    Over the last few years, Iceland has provided a bit of counter-narrative to the anarchist critique of political government. Most western democracies declared their pieces of the international finance sector “too big to fail” and bailed them out at taxpayer expense after the 2008 bank …

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  • Voluntary retirement: Can you take a hint?

    With an editorial titled “Pope Sets Example For Other Aging Leaders,” USA Today tried laying a major guilt trip on the nation’s authority figures. Despite using disclaimers such as “There is no magic age for retirement,” the newspaper clearly wants to shame prominent people into …

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