• Obama doing the Clinton Two-Step

    I only make predictions that are easy. That’s why they come true. I have no formula. You can do it, too. Just apply appropriate historical precedent, context and logic. Prediction: Syria will keep the vast majority of their chemical weapons and Iran will have nuclear …

    Read More

  • Kennedy dedicated dam 50 years ago

    Fifty years ago, President John F. Kennedy came to Arkansas and dedicated the Greers Ferry Lake project. It was his last major appearance before his ill-fated trip to Dallas, 50 days later. On that sunny Oct. 3, 1963, the youthful president remarked, “Ten years from …

    Read More

  • Well-meaning, ostentatious baby names

    What’s in a name? Way too much these days where babies are concerned. According to The Wall Street Journal, parents are obsessing over what to name their kids. They’re hiring consultants, applying mathematical formulas and software programs and even bringing in nutty spiritualist types. One …

    Read More

  • The bread basket is running low

    “Only two things are infinite: The universe and human stupidity, and I’m not so sure about the universe.” —Albert Einstein   Wow. Sure seems to be a whole lot of hoopla in the news lately about the SNAP program. First, we got to hear all …

    Read More

  • Why viewers flock to ‘Duck Dynasty’

    Like millions of Americans, I’ve become a “Duck Dynasty” fan. “Duck Dynasty,” as you surely are aware, is an A&E reality show that presents the Robertson clan, the long-bearded owners and operators of Duck Commander in West Monroe, La. Duck Commander hand-makes duck calls. The …

    Read More

  • Federal court rules Facebook ‘likes’ are protected speech

    Back in 2009, Hampton, Va., Sheriff B.J. Roberts was running for re-election. He won — and promptly fired six employees who, he said, had supported his opponent. Among the offending actions? Clicking “Like” on his opponent’s Facebook page. Politics, most would say. Nothing new about …

    Read More

  • Control of state was divided in war

    One hundred fifty years ago, the Federal army was settling in Little Rock and Pine Bluff after a hard march from Helena in the summer of 1863, culminating into several skirmishes and battles, and by late September, the blue-clad soldiers were at last in their …

    Read More

  • Idiots Against Guns

    The Idiots Against Guns in the media and Congress overdid it this time. Not wanting to miss a chance to politicize a shooting tragedy, the anti-gun nuts went berserk last Monday when news broke that a man had gone on a rampage at a D.C. …

    Read More

  • Shouldn’t artists be paid? It depends

    Recently someone on an email discussion list I follow pointed out that authors or publishers of copyrighted pieces may be reliant on royalty income for their subsistence. The alternative to proprietary information might be that “only people with income from other sources (such as academic …

    Read More

  • Civil War: Starvation at home

    Food became the most crucial problem in the South as the Civil War lingered into a third year in 1863. Farmers were urged to grow corn instead of cotton, but few Confederate soldiers were furloughed, as in the past, to help with the spring planting. …

    Read More

  • Millionaires on a food stamp diet

    If you’re a follower of the Huffington Post, you’ve probably read about Panera Bread founder and CEO Ron Shaich and his week-long commitment to spend no more than $4.50 a day on food, thus spotlighting the plight of the 49 million Americans on food stamps. …

    Read More

  • When God-talk is considered protected speech

    If you ask a class of fifth-graders to write about someone they “look up to,” don’t be shocked when at least one of them decides to write about God. That’s exactly what happened in Millington, Tenn. earlier this month when 10-year-old Erin selected God as …

    Read More