• The bread basket is running low

    “Only two things are infinite: The universe and human stupidity, and I’m not so sure about the universe.” —Albert Einstein   Wow. Sure seems to be a whole lot of hoopla in the news lately about the SNAP program. First, we got to hear all …

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  • Why viewers flock to ‘Duck Dynasty’

    Like millions of Americans, I’ve become a “Duck Dynasty” fan. “Duck Dynasty,” as you surely are aware, is an A&E reality show that presents the Robertson clan, the long-bearded owners and operators of Duck Commander in West Monroe, La. Duck Commander hand-makes duck calls. The …

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  • Federal court rules Facebook ‘likes’ are protected speech

    Back in 2009, Hampton, Va., Sheriff B.J. Roberts was running for re-election. He won — and promptly fired six employees who, he said, had supported his opponent. Among the offending actions? Clicking “Like” on his opponent’s Facebook page. Politics, most would say. Nothing new about …

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  • Control of state was divided in war

    One hundred fifty years ago, the Federal army was settling in Little Rock and Pine Bluff after a hard march from Helena in the summer of 1863, culminating into several skirmishes and battles, and by late September, the blue-clad soldiers were at last in their …

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  • Idiots Against Guns

    The Idiots Against Guns in the media and Congress overdid it this time. Not wanting to miss a chance to politicize a shooting tragedy, the anti-gun nuts went berserk last Monday when news broke that a man had gone on a rampage at a D.C. …

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  • Shouldn’t artists be paid? It depends

    Recently someone on an email discussion list I follow pointed out that authors or publishers of copyrighted pieces may be reliant on royalty income for their subsistence. The alternative to proprietary information might be that “only people with income from other sources (such as academic …

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  • Civil War: Starvation at home

    Food became the most crucial problem in the South as the Civil War lingered into a third year in 1863. Farmers were urged to grow corn instead of cotton, but few Confederate soldiers were furloughed, as in the past, to help with the spring planting. …

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  • Millionaires on a food stamp diet

    If you’re a follower of the Huffington Post, you’ve probably read about Panera Bread founder and CEO Ron Shaich and his week-long commitment to spend no more than $4.50 a day on food, thus spotlighting the plight of the 49 million Americans on food stamps. …

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  • When God-talk is considered protected speech

    If you ask a class of fifth-graders to write about someone they “look up to,” don’t be shocked when at least one of them decides to write about God. That’s exactly what happened in Millington, Tenn. earlier this month when 10-year-old Erin selected God as …

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  • Perhaps it’s time to bring back Cliff Huxtable

    Last week I saw a video on Facebook that gave me a chuckle. It appears some dad was aggravated because his daughter was wearing “booty” shorts, so to teach her a lesson he put on a pair himself and wore them in public. Nothing funnier …

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  • Interesting student communications

    Most of my college students are bright, fun to teach, and work hard. But each semester I get interesting letters, emails and phone calls from a few students that I save for future column material. With the school year now under way, I thought I’d …

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  • Consequences for sex scandals

    So much for voters being poised to show that they don’t care about sex scandals anymore. Forget about former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford’s surprise May election to the House of Representatives despite the sex scandal stemming from his lie about hiking on the “Appalachian …

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