• Jimmy Driftwood wrote songs for history students

    The Ozark Mountains region has produced many talented and celebrated musicians over the last several decades. Perhaps one of the most clever was Arkansas’ own Jimmy Driftwood. Born James Morris in Stone County in 1907, he grew up with modest means in a farming family …

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  • A future with Bill Clinton as ‘first guy’

    When Bill Clinton said President Obama should allow people to keep their health-insurance coverage — an early attempt to distance Hillary and himself from ObamaCare — a couple weeks ago I began to worry that the Clintons may be serious about another run at the …

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  • ‘Poor Preachers’ Frank, Jesse James’ connection to Independence, Izard areas

    Beau and I recently attended the United Methodist Church services in Mountain View. The message was on stewardship and doing things on someone else’s nickel. Using the scenario of a restored train station where historic parking meters are still used showing only whether your time …

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  • ‘Rainbow Bridge’ nationally recognized

    Following on the heels of Batesville’s new bridge in 1928, was Cotter’s graceful rainbow-arched bridge, completed in 1930. The state paid the Cotter ferryboat owner $250 to end his service, which was no longer needed. Before the bridge opened, persons in the Cotter region urgently …

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  • Thanksgiving always tastes better when it’s shared

    My parents found out that Mr. Tawson not only refused to hold a job, but took most of his wife’s paycheck for himself, leaving almost nothing for her to purchase food to feed herself and their children. There were few things in life that disgusted …

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  • Arkansas’ Bob Riley was first legally blind governor in U.S.

    Bob Riley was an educator, politician and patriot. He would not let wartime injuries slow him down, overcoming them to become Arkansas governor. Riley was born in Little Rock in 1924. He had a fascination with politics from an early age, serving as a page …

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  • Why there’s lots to celebrate this Thanksgiving

    Sure, the country isn’t doing so well at the moment, but there are still plenty of reasons to be thankful this Thanksgiving. I sit at the “big people’s table” now, just to the left of my father. It took me years to earn that coveted …

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  • Let’s buy the kids a Ferrari

    A while back I read a story making news all over the state about the unfortunate 9-year-old who was robbed of his iPhone at the school bus stop, by someone who threatened him with a box cutter if he didn’t hand it over. How scary …

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  • 8-year-old reminds dad of blessings

    The American Thanksgiving holiday has a rich and storied history full of lessons reminding us to give thanks for our many blessings. In school, we learn the story of a gathering between the Plymouth Pilgrims and Wampanoag Indians in 1621, where both sides came together …

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  • Making the argument for giving thanks

    In 1863, President Abraham Lincoln called a nation divided by war to join together in a time of corporate thanksgiving and repentance when he proclaimed that Americans “set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to …

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  • Holiday goes to the dogs

    In 2006 I came up against a holiday deadline crunch, so I turned my column over to Turpy, the beloved 8-year-old golden retriever/chow mix who had turned up at our doorstep as a puppy. Turpy provided the column that follows: Hi! Over the river and …

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  • Dutch Queen, Wilhelmina, never came to Ark.

    When the railroad was constructed from Fort Smith to Texarkana during the 1890s, officials sought to increase passenger traffic by building a resort on the state’s second highest peak, near present-day Mena. Due to the fact that Dutch investors had banked heavily on the railway, …

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