• First Arkansas cartoon in 1852

    William “Bill” Quesenbury, who pronounced his surname “Cushenberry,” was a writer, printer, soldier, poet, artist, and the state’s very first cartoonist. Born on Aug. 21, 1822, in Crawford County, Quesenbury attended school in Fort Smith and college in Bardstown, Ky. His first job was writing …

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  • No, there’s not a new national anthem

    Just like millions of Americans a few weeks ago, I got totally caught up in the Super Bowl craze. Granted, it wasn’t my beloved Chicago Bears playing, or my husband’s favorite, the Dallas Cowboys, but still, there’s nothing like three hours of football, complete with …

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  • SI swimsuit issue

    Editor’s note: The following is an excerpt from Tom Purcell’s new book, “Comical Sense: A Lone Humorist Takes on a World Gone Nutty!,” available at amazon.com.   It disgusts me more every year. I speak of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue, which is published the …

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  • Bumbos, boosters and highchairs, oh my! Study: Injuries from falls on the rise

    When my kids were growing up, a highchair was about as sophisticated as a feeding seat got! Nowadays, parents have more options, including Bumbo seats, to make feeding little ones more convenient. But with the convenience of these upgraded highchairs and alternate feeding seats comes …

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  • Losing ourselves in snow, cold

    Let’s keep it together, people. I speak of the way we are responding to record snow and cold sweeping across vast regions of the country. People are cussing at snowplow drivers and each other. Panicked shoppers are fighting over toilet paper and milk. Americans are …

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  • Green Rush munchies

    It’s easy to imagine an arena full of Phish fans raising and waving their lighters to honor U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder for suggesting the feds might help states that legalize pot by allowing dispensaries to utilize banking services. Way to go, Super AG. That’s …

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  • Learning to cook

    When I was growing up one talent that both my parents stressed I should acquire was learning to cook. Perhaps it was their foresight that it would not be likely to find women in my generation willing to dedicate themselves totally to cooking, cleaning and …

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  • Legitimizing rape

    The charge of rape is a successful way to smear your enemy. When political agitator Andrew Breitbart was met with Occupy protestors one year at the Conservative Political Action Conference, he started screeching, “Behave yourselves and stop raping people!” Russian President Vladimir Putin used this …

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  • Helena was busy garrison for Union army

    One hundred fifty years ago, Helena was a busy garrison for the Union army. According to a dispatch sent from Gen. Buford, a large number of Confederate scouts was captured in the Delta. Buford related that 28 Confederate privates were sent to Alton and six …

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  • If you’re reading this, you’re probably a terrorist

    This has been one of those times that a series of random, seemingly unrelated events have all reinforced a common lesson for me. First, it was reported on Jan. 21 (“Opposed to Fracking? You Might Be a Terrorist,” PopularResistance.org) that Canadian and U.S. law enforcement …

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  • Vance Randolph: Folklorist of the Ozarks

    Like many scholars, Vance Randolph’s lifelong work was not recognized until near the end of his life. While in his early 20s, he had a strong desire to study Ozark mountain culture. Randolph was born in 1892 in Pittsburg, Kan., to John (an attorney) and …

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  • CrossFit: Working out an understanding

    Flipping through a recent issue of Time magazine, I discovered the wildly popular phenomenon CrossFit and similar extreme workout programs. The hyperintensive exercise sessions weed out a high percentage of the merely curious, but are almost a religion for those dedicated enough to stick with …

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